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Kinds of blood seen by women » Laws of a woman in menstruation (ḥāʾiḍ) → ← Kinds of blood seen by women » Laws of istiḥāḍah

Kinds of blood seen by women » Menstruation (ḥayḍ)

Ḥayḍ is blood that is usually discharged from the uterus of women every month for a few days. A woman in menstruation is called a ‘ḥāʾiḍ’.

Ruling 432. Most of the time, the blood of ḥayḍ is thick and warm, and its colour is black or red, and it comes out with a little pressure and with a burning sensation.

Ruling 433. The bleeding that women above the age of sixty experience is not ruled as ḥayḍ; however, a woman can experience ḥayḍ between the age of fifty and sixty, although the recommended precaution is that women who are not Qurayshi (sayyidah)(1) and who experience bleeding which would previously have been ruled as ḥayḍ [i.e. had they experienced it before the age of fifty, it would have been ruled as ḥayḍ], should refrain from doing the things that are unlawful for a ḥāʾiḍ to do and perform the duties of a mustaḥāḍah.

Ruling 434. Bleeding that a girl experiences before the age of nine is not ḥayḍ.

Ruling 435. It is possible for a pregnant woman and for a woman who is breastfeeding to menstruate. The ruling of a pregnant woman and a non-pregnant woman is the same, except that if a pregnant woman experiences bleeding with the attributes of ḥayḍ after the passing of twenty days from the first day of her habit, it is necessary for her, based on obligatory precaution, to do the things that a mustaḥāḍah must do and refrain from doing the things that are unlawful for a ḥāʾiḍ to do.

Ruling 436. If a girl who does not know whether or not she has completed nine years of age experiences bleeding that does not have the attributes of ḥayḍ, it is not ḥayḍ. And if it has the attributes of ḥayḍ, then considering it to be ḥayḍ is problematic [i.e. based on obligatory precaution, it must not be considered to be ḥayḍ], unless one is confident that it is ḥayḍ, in which case the girl will be considered to have reached the age of nine.

Ruling 437. If a woman who doubts whether or not she has reached the age of sixty experiences bleeding but does not know whether it is ḥayḍ or not, she must assume that she has not reached the age of sixty.

Ruling 438. Ḥayḍ cannot last for less than three days or for more than ten days; if bleeding lasts for even a little less than three days, it is not ḥayḍ.

Ruling 439. The first three days of ḥayḍ must be continuous; therefore, if, for example, a woman experiences bleeding for two days, and then the bleeding stops for one day, and then she experiences bleeding again for one day, it is not ḥayḍ.

Ruling 440. At the beginning of ḥayḍ, it is necessary for the blood to come out. However, it is not necessary for the blood to come out on all three days and it is sufficient if the blood remains inside the vagina. And in the event that during the three days a woman’s bleeding stops for a short period of time in a manner that is common among all or some women, it is still counted as ḥayḍ.

Ruling 441. It is not necessary for a woman to experience bleeding on the eve of the first and fourth day. However, the bleeding must not stop on the eve of the second and third day. Therefore, if from the start of the morning of the first day the bleeding continues until sunset of the third day and does not stop at all, it is ḥayḍ. The same applies if it starts during the first day and stops at the same time on the fourth day.

Ruling 442. If a woman experiences bleeding for three consecutive days and then her bleeding stops, in the event that she experiences bleeding again and the days on which she experiences bleeding plus the days on which her bleeding stops in between altogether do not exceed ten, then the blood on all the days that she experienced bleeding is ḥayḍ. However, the obligatory precaution is that on the days that her bleeding stops in between, she must do the things that are obligatory for a non-ḥāʾiḍ and refrain from doing the things that are unlawful for a ḥāʾiḍ.

Ruling 443. If a woman experiences bleeding for more than three and less than ten days, but she does not know whether the bleeding is from a boil, wound, or due to ḥayḍ, she must not consider it to be ḥayḍ.

Ruling 444. If a woman experiences bleeding but does not know whether it is from a wound or due to ḥayḍ, she must perform her ritual acts of worship (ʿibādāt) [as normal], unless prior to this she was in the state of ḥayḍ [in which case she would consider it to be ḥayḍ].

Ruling 445. If a woman experiences bleeding and doubts whether it is ḥayḍ or istiḥāḍah, in the event that it has the conditions of ḥayḍ, it must be considered to be ḥayḍ.

Ruling 446. If a woman experiences bleeding and she does not know whether it is ḥayḍ or bleeding caused by her hymen tearing, she must examine herself; i.e. she must insert some cotton in the vagina, wait a while, and then take it out. If she finds that blood has stained only the sides of the cotton, it is bleeding caused by her hymen tearing, but if it has reached all parts of the cotton, it is ḥayḍ.

Ruling 447. If a woman experiences bleeding for less than three days, and then her bleeding stops, and afterwards she experiences bleeding again for three days, the second bleeding is ḥayḍ and the first bleeding – even if she experiences it during her habitual period – is not ḥayḍ.

(1) A sayyidah is a female descendant of Hāshim, the great grandfather of Prophet Muḥammad (Ṣ).
Kinds of blood seen by women » Laws of a woman in menstruation (ḥāʾiḍ) → ← Kinds of blood seen by women » Laws of istiḥāḍah
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