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Chapter thirty-two » Method of slaughtering an animal → ← Chapter thirty-one » Found Property

Chapter thirty-two » Slaughtering and Hunting Animals

Ruling 2600. If either a wild or domesticated animal whose meat is lawful (ḥalāl) to eat is slaughtered in accordance with the instructions that will be mentioned later, then after it dies, its meat is lawful to eat and its body is pure (ṭāhir). In order for a camel, fish, and locust to become lawful to eat, there are other ways; these will be mentioned in the following rulings (masāʾil).

Ruling 2601. If a wild animal whose meat is lawful to eat, such as a deer, partridge, or mountain goat, is killed by hunting in accordance with the instructions that will be mentioned later, it becomes pure and lawful to eat. The same applies to a domesticated animal whose meat is lawful to eat and has turned wild, such as a domesticated cow or camel that fled and has become wild or unyielding and cannot be caught. However, a domesticated animal whose meat is lawful to eat, such as a sheep or a hen, and a wild animal whose meat is lawful to eat and has been domesticated through training, does not become pure or lawful to eat if it is killed by hunting.

Ruling 2602. A wild animal whose meat is lawful to eat can only become pure and lawful to eat by hunting it if it is able to flee or fly away. Therefore, a fawn [a baby deer] that cannot flee or a cheeper [a baby partridge] that cannot fly away, does not become pure and lawful to eat if it is killed by hunting. If a person kills a deer and its fawn that is unable to flee using one arrow, the deer is lawful to eat but the fawn is unlawful (ḥarām).

Ruling 2603. If an animal whose meat is lawful to eat and whose blood does not gush out [when its jugular vein is cut], such as a fish, dies on its own accord, it is pure but its meat cannot be eaten.

Ruling 2604. An animal whose meat is unlawful to eat and whose blood does not gush out, such as a snake and lizard, is pure when it is dead; therefore, killing it by hunting or slaughtering it does not change this.

Ruling 2605. Slaughtering a dog or a pig or killing it by hunting does not make it pure as these animals cannot be made pure. Furthermore, it is unlawful to eat their meat. Similarly, the flesh and skin of small animals that live in nests in the ground and have blood that gushes out, such as mice and ferrets, does not become pure if such animals are killed by hunting.

Ruling 2606. The flesh and skin of animals whose meat is unlawful to eat – except those mentioned in the previous ruling (masʾalah) – becomes pure if they are slaughtered or killed by hunting with a weapon, whether the animal is a predatory one or not. This applies even to elephants, bears, and apes (about which there is a difference of opinion from a jurisprudential perspective). However, if animals whose meat cannot be eaten are killed by hunting dogs, then to consider them as being pure is problematic (maḥall al-ishkāl) [i.e. based on obligatory precaution (al-iḥtiyāṭ al-wājib), they are not considered pure].(1)

Ruling 2607. If a dead baby animal is delivered or taken out from the womb of a live animal, it is unlawful to eat its meat.

(1) As mentioned in Ruling 6, the term ‘problematic’ (maḥall al-ishkāl) amounts to saying that the ruling is based on obligatory precaution.
Chapter thirty-two » Method of slaughtering an animal → ← Chapter thirty-one » Found Property
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